Designing (for) Women

Designing (for) Women

I'm in the thick of it as usual. Most days I get stuck in a routine: one that I started almost 18 years ago. As the fashion designer / creative director at Crisiswear, I want to spend my days creating the beautiful futuristic clothing that lives inside my mind. While in reality I sit alongside my stitchers, day in and day out, making many of our styles from start to finish; dreaming of designing new gear. But despite my narrow window of free time, I'm working hard to bring more of my designs into the world.

Recently, I found myself explaining the difficulty of designing women’s pants and why we haven’t introduced any new styles in a while. From the outside and on paper, those designs are easy, due to the beautiful curves and subtle flows of the female form. But when moved from concept to execution, those same wonderful curves turn into pattern making curve-balls. Drafting the correct hip curve and making sure the waistband sits at high hip without gapping, are just a few of the challenges that I need to overcome, and that's before adding pockets and building in the unique edge that makes everything we create, well, Crisiswear.

This leads me to our next challenge: how do we move forward with our size ratios? From the outside, it may seem that Crisiswear is building exclusivity into its designs by making clothes for skinny people with "perfect" bodies. But the reality is that as a small studio with limited time and budget, we have been unable to do the R&D necessary to pattern up as many sizes as we would like. Sadly enough, it's not judgement or snobbery, but rather limited resources on our end that have kept us out of the plus size market.

That being said, we are working to change this. We have recently shifted mill vendors, allowing us to improve the sustainability and consistency of our fabrics. And this, in turn, will allow us access to more and better kinds of stretch and performance fabrics that will provide more forgiveness, along with ease of movement and durability. We're particularly excited about a new black Chino twill that is going to look and feel great for a wider variety of our clients.

In short, we're grateful for your support and understanding and we are looking forward to providing more and better women's options and sizes in the short and near term. In fact, we expect to soon release the XX answer to our Division Line of men's pants: the FATALE MK1. Stay tuned!

 

And Last But Not Least
If you're a woman that is looking for more options from Crisiswear, let us know in the comments what you are looking for in tops and bottoms. And feel free to chime in with things that you love or hate about women's clothes in general. The more we learn about you, the better we can make our clothes.

7 comments

Write a comment
Q

Q

I’m really happy to read this, as I’ve always really liked your designs but felt very put out by how they’re only made for one body type so at least now I understand better why. I’m not a plus size, just average but with a large bust and lacking in perfectly flat abs. I’ve never seen a Crisiswear piece which would fit me, but I keep watching and waiting…

Oh and I totally agree with all of the previous suggestions about pockets and such! I’m always looking for pockets, especially with anything I can wear dancing.

V

V

I like the previous commentor’s suggestion for underbust offerings. It’s actually quite ingenious, as it saves you from the headache of designing around the bust, and the fit issues that inevitably arise. It allows you to use the stiffer rugged materials that’s iconic to your brand and fits perfectly within the aesthetic. Plus, it would work well together with most of the existing designs. I personally find that garments with substantial hoods (like the Rogue Cowl) both look and fit better with some kind of underbust attachment.

Vorsaga

Vorsaga

Two comments for women’s clothing:
1. I adore vests but they are almost impossible to find and wear for women. What I would adore is an underbust racerback vest made with pockets at the lower ribs/torso. If it’s worn closed it can be form fitting (like over a looser dress) or worn open it’s more of a utility harness but actual pockets.

2. Speaking of pockets – there is much more value to a pocket that can hold things rather than one that has a smooth design line for women that are looking for pockets in their garments. Men’s cargo pants (traditional, main stream) have this sort of pocket where the the fabric is at least an inch wide beyond the leg of the pant and then there is a second layer of fabric making the pocket, making something of a box that sticks out. These are usually closed by buttons/snaps. What I want is something like this on my looser fitting women’s pants where that inch of fabric is elastic/elasticized so it will hold closer when it’s empty but will expand when I need it to. (Even if it’s a bungee cord that I need to cinche, that’s fine!) Just something so that I can put stuff IN the pocket and not have to restrict my movement as a result.

Thanks for taking comments. It really increases my respect for your brand. ;)

On another note – more white options please!!! I’d buy almost everything on here if it came in an opaque white fabric. (I’m a Jeeper so I’m in the sun all day and will roast if I wear so that much black all the time, but your hoods and the sleeve/hood only garments are so perfect for driving that I’m tempted to get one and just suffer while off-roading. haha!)

N

N

Thanks for exploring this topic. With women’s clothing, I often find myself underserved when it comes to everyday utilitarian basics with unique, thoughtful design details. Pants are really challenging to fit, which is why I often wear black cotton leggings under a utility skirt. Yet even good utility skirts are currently hard to find at the moment. In the past, I have looked at these Crisiswear shorts pictured here and thought, “Wish they made that in an a-line skirt.” A-line, because pencil type skirts restrict movement. Proper fitting pants are true unicorns. Will definitely check our your new design when it launches. Please include as much information in the size chart as you can. Hip to waist ratios and length of rise can help determine viability. Best of luck!

Anne

Anne

I’m tall and quite thin, and I don’t have too much in the way of curves at all. It can be difficult to find ANY, yet alone cyber-style trouers suitable for everyday wear! As a body piercing and modification artist, I tend to be very mobile throghout the day. Trousers that have the futuristic, avant-garde, alternative aesthetic I prefer but are sturdy and functional at the same time would be absolutely amazing.

I tend to wear mostly calf to knee length boots, so my personal preference is a more fitted leg shilouette. I prefer details on the upper leg and waist to give the illusion of having more curves. It’s understandable how it’s very tricky to balance designs for body types since what works for one won’t suit others at all!

Your clothing looks amazing, and I would absolutely love to purchase a pair of women’s trousers when they’re up! Crisiswear popped up on my Facebook feed and I can honestly say that I’m very glad it did.

Elle

Elle

Great post, glad to hear the new changes coming! I would love it if you could make some pants for girls that have actual useful utilitarian pockets. Women’s pants in general lacks pockets that will fit anything more than a few coins.
Also, shirts (and/or jackets) that cover the midrif in monochromatic colours for more every day sophisticated looks are always awesome.

gina d

gina d

Curves are tricky!
I’m all curves set on twigs for legs so defaulting into mens bottoms has been the solution for me. I’d rather have a drop crotch than a muffin top and camel toe because the rise I need doesn’t exist. Mens shorts fall like a wide leg capri, so it doesn’t look or feel 1/2 bad. Though I wouldn’t love a pair of shorts/pants that have a curve hugging fit like a lycra capri but with the fabric, function, futuristic design, and finishing touches that is synonymous with Crisiswear. Womans plus size is so hard. I feel either our choices are less tailored looks or fast fashion with its crappy construction, horrid fabrics, and shitty finishing. Personally I like less bulk at the waist (I have enough there already) and more detail from the hip down on skirts. That way I can wear top that lays flat-ish (and or a corset to help keep the curves curvy). It can be tricky as a plus size girl to shop without initially trying on because our curves will catch the fabric in ways that designs may not account for.
All that being said, Crisiswear for me at least does fairly accommodate curves. I am a proud owner of several Crisiswear pieces and all have stood the test of time and some good dancefloor beatings. I wear my cowl dress a lot and curvy and non-curvy alike always ask where I got it. Oh and if you ever need some curves to test run some designs, I got you ;)

Write a comment

Comments are moderated